ICC introduces Red Card to International Cricket

 . Last updated on June 6, 2017, 3:02 PM
ICC introduces Red Card to International Cricket
Bat dimension regulation is expected to render uniformity in the game.


Several new cricket rules are on the way to its implementation. Recently, ICC adopted a set of new rules as Laws of Cricket, after the annual meet in May. The restrictions on bat dimensions, changes in run out rules and strict disciplinary action on field to curtail misconduct and aggression at play. Per the new regulations the edge of a bat will remain limited to 40 mm and the depth of the bat should be 67 mm. 60 mm is the allowed depth and 7 mm is allowed for a possible curve. The change in run-out rule allows batsmen to remain not-out by only by landing the bat behind the crease before the ball touches the stumps. Thus, even if the bat bounces after touching the crease, it will be enough to rule out a possible run-out.

Red Card is introduced for first time in cricket as a disciplinary action against players. Red Card will be used in cases of physical violence including threatening an umpire and physical assault. Although, such incidences rarely occur at international level, there are many such instances in lower level cricket. A red card will ban the player from the entire game. Since such aggressive incidents do not happen much in international cricket, the red card rule is expected to have a little impact.

The new set of rules will be implemented from 1st of October 2017. Per Chair of Cricket Committee, Anil Kumble, the rules, especially the size regulation of bat will balance the game on a larger scale. There were series of debates on size of bat. The new regulation will fix the upper limit of bat thickness and depth. Currently, several players use bats of thicker edge creating a difference in their strike and hitting power. The new rules will bring on a uniformity in bat sizes. The run-out impasse was long standing bringing confusion over the wicket. The new law has put an end to the bat bouncing dilemma in run-out cases.

TAGS

Please Enter comment Body

Welcome!

Login to the Cricket Bolo Comments